© Steve Trudell

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Danny’s DNA Discoveries – Fayodiaceae of the PNW (Tricholomatineae)
by Danny Miller

Introduction

Fayodia - a mycenoid with round, warty, amyloid spores, making it unique under the microscope but very difficult to separate from Mycena without one.

Gamundia - somewhat mycenoid, recognized microscopically by inamyloid spores that appear spiny under oil immersion from pores in the cell wall.

Myxomphalia - a burn site omphalinoid with a slightly depressed cap, usually slightly decurrent gills and a somewhat viscid, gelatinous cap cuticle. Spring and fall. Amyloid spores.

abundant common uncommon rare - colour codes match my Pictorial Key and are my opinions and probably reflect my bias of living in W WA. Rare species may be locally common in certain places at certain times.

Click here to download the FASTA data of all my DNA sequences

Fayodia

Fayodia cf gracilipes EU (F. bisphaerigera EU misapplied?, =Mycena rainierensis WA?) - a mycenoid with round, warty, amyloid spores, making it unique under the microscope but very difficult to separate from Mycena without one. Possible OR and NWT sequences match a possible F. gracilipes sequence from Russia better than they match F. bisphaerigera sequences, so that may be our local species. Many people consider them synonyms, but more DNA evidence is needed to find out if they really are or not. Mycena rainierensis, with greatly elongated cystidia and a paler colour should be investigated to see if it is the same as Fayodia gracilipes. If not, it needs to be moved to Fayodia. We need confirmed PNW collections of all of the above.

possible Fayodia sp. © Christian Schwarz

Gamundia

Gamundia cf. leucophylla EU (=G. striatula EU?/=Mycena cineraria WA) - somewhat mycenoid, recognized microscopically by inamyloid spores that appear spiny under oil immersion from pores in the cell wall. A possible Gamundia leucophylla EU sequence from the EU is only 3 bp and 1 indel different than several EU Gamundia striatula EU sequences, and all the differences are in ITS1. Some synonymize them. Our local species varies by 5 bp from those EU G. striatula sequences, but only in ITS2. Therefore, our sequences vary from the EU G. leucophylla sequence in both ITS1 and ITS2. Is it all one species or three species? We may need a multi-gene study. If it's all one species, G. leucophylla may be the oldest name. If not, our local species Mycena cineraria WA, currently thought to be synonym of Gamundia striatula, should be moved to Gamundia to become the name of our species.

Gamundia sp. #2? - the sequenced Gamundia does not quite look like Gamundias that others have found in the PNW so we need more collections to determine if there is a second species here.

Gamundia cf. leucophylla © Lauren Ré,     unsequenced possible Gamundia © Connor Dooley

Myxomphalia

Myxomphalia maura EU - a burn site omphalinoid with a slightly depressed cap, usually slightly decurrent gills and a somewhat viscid, gelatinous cap cuticle. It may smell spermatic like Inocybe. Spring and fall. Amyloid spores. There is a burn site Lyophyllum, but it is not viscid and does not have an indented cap. An OR sequence, AK sequence and other east and west coast sequences match EU sequences very well.

Myxomphalia maura © Steve Trudell

 

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