© A and O Ceska

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Danny’s DNA Discoveries – Glomeromycota and Zygomycota of the PNW
by Danny Miller

Introduction

abundant common uncommon rare - colour codes match my Pictorial Key and are my opinions and probably reflect my bias of living in W WA. Rare species may be locally common in certain places at certain times.

Glomeromycota and Zygomycota

Contrary to popular belief, some fairly large fruitbodies can be made outside of the 'basidio' and 'asco' phyla. While it's true that there are many other phyla in kingdom fungi, and they mostly produce microscopic "molds", there are some 'large' mushrooms to be found. You can recognize them by giant spores that are usually between 50 and 300 microns instead of the usual 10 microns or so found in 'basidios' and 'ascos'.

Endogone pisiformis

Little yellow blobs, about 1-5 mm across, on soil, wood, moss or polypores, that are not jelly like, nor slimy (like young slime molds) nor powdery (like older slime molds). (Slime molds are not covered here because they are not in kingdom fungi). Uncommon.

We need European sequences and local sequences to verify that we have the actual European species here, and not a lookalike.

 

Endogone pisiformis © A and O Ceska

 

Most other species in these phyla that you are likely to come across are false truffles without much of an outer skin (you can see right through to the spongy interior). If anything, the outer layer is a bunch of cottony threads holding the thing together. Gautieria are similar 'basidio' false truffles with exteriors that can wear away, but they are not uniformly sponge-like inside, they have a false columella (primitive stem) inside.

Endogone spp. in the Zygomycota often exude a milky latex when cut fresh.

Glomera spp. in the Glomeromycota do not.

Endogone lactiflua © Matt Trappe, an example of a false truffle with thin cottony exterior that exudes a latex.

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